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Movie Review - The Verge

Movie opinions

Feb 21, 2018. A quick-and-dirty genre romp, scripted, shot and cut with itchy, unpretty zeal — and performed with image-altering gusto by Claire Foy. Classic tale of teenage rebellion and repression features a delightful combination of dance choreography and realistic and touching performances. When teenager Ren Mc Cormack and his family move from big-city Chicago to a small Midwestern town, he's in for a real case of culture shock. Though he tries hard to fit in, the streetwise Ren can't quite believe he's living in a place where rock music and dancing are illegal. However, there is one small pleasure: Ariel Moore, a troubled but lovely blonde with a jealous boyfriend. And a Bible-thumping minister, who is responsible for keeping the town dance-free.

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Plugged In

Movie opinions

Find the latest movie reviews from Empire, the world's biggest movie destination. Discover Empire's take on the latest cinema, Blu-ray and DVD releases. Plugged In exists to shine a light on the world of popular entertainment while giving you and your family the essential tools you need to understand, navigate and impact the culture in which we live. Through reviews, articles and discussions, we want to spark intellectual thought, spiritual growth and a desire to follow the command of Colossians 2:8: "See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the basic principles of this world rather than on Christ.""I am at a loss for words to adequately express how much it means to my husband and me to know that there is an organization like Focus that is rooting for us. Just today I was reading Psalm 37 and thinking about how your ministry provides ways to 'dwell in the land and enjoy safe pasture.' We have two teenagers and an 8-year-old in our household... Plugged In has become a significant compass for our family. All three of our kids are dedicated to their walk with Christ but they still encounter challenges. Thanks for all of your research and persistence in helping us navigate through stormy waters.""Thanks for the great job you do in posting movie and television reviews online. I’m a college freshman and I recently had a confrontational disagreement with my English professor regarding an R-rated film. It is her favorite movie and she wanted to show it in class.

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Movie Reviews | Fandango

Movie opinions

Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films and the film medium. The concept is often used interchangeably with that of the film reviews. A film review implies a recommendation aimed at consumers, however not all film criticism takes the form of reviews. In general, film criticism can be divided into two categories. The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show. Certified Fresh Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics. Red Sparrow isn't great in any way, but, at two hours and twenty minutes, we do get our money's worth of old-school genre entertainment, and with action that jumps nicely about the globe from Washington to Moscow to Budapest to London. At its best, it is solidly engaging, blistering and intense filmmaking; at its worst, well, in a post award season schedule, it's still one of the better, more original releases in the cinematic landscape at the moment. Anyone hoping for a stylish, fluid action thriller a la John Wick or Atomic Blonde will be sorely disappointed. Despite the occasional glimmers of style, Red Sparrow flies right past dumb fun and smacks right into dumb. She's such a good actor that her cheekbones seem to change nationalities as effectively as her accent does. But she can't keep wasting her time on sub-par material like this.

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Film Review 'Ready Player One' - Variety

Movie opinions

Mar 12, 2018. Steven Spielberg turns Ernest Cline's novel into a virtual-reality thriller that's entrancing when it's virtual, less so when it's real. Angourie Rice, Justice Smith, Jeni Ross, Lucas Jade Zumann, Rory Mc Donald, Katie Douglas, Jacob Batalon, Ian Alexander, Colin Ford, Jake Sim, Nicole Law, Karena Evans, Owen Teague, Maria Bello, Michael Cram. When it comes to romantic matchups, Hollywood has never been particularly shy about pairing a conventional human being with a fluky, not-of-this-earth partner: a mermaid, a superhero, King Kong, or Zach Galifianakis. But “Every Day,” an adaptation of David Levithan’s 2012 young-adult novel, marks a surprisingly original entry in the genre of fanciful mismatched love story. The film’s heroine, Rhiannon (Angourie Rice), is an effervescent, tuned-in, and utterly normal teenager growing up in a woodsy suburb of Baltimore. The character she falls head over heels for is…a spirit.

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Review: 'Love Never Dies' | Backstage

Movie opinions

How scary is Pennywise the Clown in It? And is the movie OK for teens? Find out with Common Sense Media's review of the 2017 Stephen King adaptation. The Tomatometer score — based on the opinions of hundreds of film and television critics — is a trusted measurement of critical recommendation for millions of fans. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show. Certified Fresh Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics. Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

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Star Wars: The Last Jedi is being review-bombed on Rotten Tomatoes (update) - Polygon

Movie opinions

It may be common knowledge that the 1995 classic movie Casino is based on a true story. Which parts are true and which are exaggerated, Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films and the film medium. The concept is often used interchangeably with that of the film reviews. A film review implies a recommendation aimed at consumers, however not all film criticism takes the form of reviews. In general, film criticism can be divided into two categories: journalistic criticism which appears regularly in newspapers, magazines and other popular mass-media outlets; and academic criticism by film scholars who are informed by film theory and are published in academic journals. Academic film criticism rarely takes the form of a review; instead it is more likely to analyse the film and its place within the history of its genre, or the whole of film history.

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Interstellar - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Movie opinions

Dec 20, 2017. “Bright” is the best Netflix original movie to date, and it absolutely deserves to be seen on the big screen, though don't let that stop you from watching it home, as “End of Watch” director David Ayer's welcome return to the cop-movie genre — following a disastrous wrong turn into “Suicide Squad” territory. Scary, and not just in a typical gory slasher or jump scare way; it generates actual tingles. (And if you're scared of clowns, it's even worse.) Things get pretty gory; characters are stabbed, impaled, and beaten with rocks and blunt objects. A boy's arm is bitten off, teens shoot guns, and a sheep is killed with a bolt gun. Language is also very strong, with a lot of the swearing coming from young teens; you'll hear "f--k," "s--t," and more. There's lots of bullying, and an abusive father acts in a creepily sexual way toward his teen daughter.

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Whose ratings should you trust? IMDB, Rotten Tomatoes, Metacritic.

Movie opinions

Apr 10, 2017. Should you watch a movie? Well, there are a lot of factors to consider, such as the director, the actors, and the movie's budget. Most of us base our decision off of a review, a short trailer, or just by checking the movie's rating. There are a few good reasons you would want to avoid reading reviews. PLOT: Armed with a single camera, no lights or crew, director William Friedkin films the ninth exorcism of an Italian woman, performed by famed priest, Father Gabriele Amorth. REVIEW: Evil is only as potent as the belief you lend to it. That is, to even think about the forces of darkness is to inherently invite them in. Such a theme hovers like a fed-up fantom over THE DEVIL AND FATHER AMORTH, William Friedkins curious but uneven new documentary that soberly probes the question of whether religious exorcisms really do work in ridding evil possession, or if, through the power of suggestion, they can inadvertently inflict more harm than good. Greater questions are posed than answers given in this regard, all of which revolve around the centerpiece of the 68-minute account, an awkwardly anticlimactic but nevertheless fascinating real-life exorcism performed on a demonically possessed Italian woman. Its worth judging the veracity of the event yourself, even if its nowhere near as harrowingly sensationalized as in Friedkins THE EXORCIST, arguably the greatest horror film ever made. Whether its done out of a pathetically effete attempt to cash in on what made him so famous four decades ago, or done out of a sort of sympathetic obligation that success yielded, I cant quite tell. Either way you frame it, THE DEVIL AND FATHER AMORTH is a brisk, mildly enthralling watch from an old master!

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Permission Movie Review & Film Summary 2018 Roger Ebert

Movie opinions

Feb 9, 2018. If you watched only the trailer, you might dismiss "Permission," written and directed by Brian Crano. It looks like a run-of-the-mill comedy about a bored couple deciding to sleep with other people. Didn't 2011's "Hall Pass" already cover this? But Crano's film is refreshingly complex and filled with the. There’s boring, there’s bad, and then there’s “Bright,” a movie so profoundly awful that Republicans will probably try to pass it into law over Christmas break. From the director of “Suicide Squad” and the writer of “Victor Frankenstein” comes a fresh slice of hell that somehow represents new lows for them both — a dull and painfully derivative ordeal that often feels like it was made just to put those earlier misfires into perspective. The only thing more predictable than this high-concept police story is the idea that a year as punishing as 2017 would save the worst for last. At least “The Emoji Movie” owned up to the fact that it was just putting shit on screen; at least “The Emoji Movie” had the courtesy to dress it up in a bowtie. A $90 million blockbuster that boasts all the production value of an episode of “Charmed,” Netflix’s first mega-budget film effort starts with a potentially compelling premise that never gets off the ground.

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Rotten Tomatoes: Movies | TV Shows | Movie Trailers | Reviews

Movie opinions

Get exclusive film and movie reviews from THR, the leading source of film reviews online. We take an honest look at the best and worst movies Hollywood has to offer. Fandango is your source for movie reviews and movie ratings to help maximize your movie-going-experience. Our easy to use movie reviews and movie ratings are based on scores and opinions from respected movie critics, family advocacy groups and movie fans like you. Whether it’s a family movie outing, first date or girls’ night out, our movie reviews will help you find the perfect movie for any occasion.

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Real Movie Opinions | CINEMABLEND

Movie opinions

Rating, Movie, Review, Critic. 1/4, The Lullaby, "A promising premise ineptly botched in execution. " Posted Feb 27, 2018 AM UTC. Roger Moore · Movie Nation. 3/4, Love, Simon, "Greg Berlanti's charmingly heartfelt film is a remarkably successful attempt to give shape to the experience of the closet by drawing an. If you watched only the trailer, you might dismiss "Permission," written and directed by Brian Crano. (He's even bought a ring, but he's waiting for the right moment to pop the question.) At dinner one night with Anna's brother Hale (David Joseph Craig) and Hale's long-term boyfriend Reece (Morgan Spector), Reece makes fun of Anna and Will for only having had sex with each other. Reece is joking, but Anna and Will are jolted by the observation. Crano is interested in relationships, and how they grow and develop (or don't). It looks like a run-of-the-mill comedy about a bored couple deciding to sleep with other people. But Crano's film is refreshingly complex and filled with the unexpected. D in music, and he makes furniture in his own shop in a Brooklyn storefront. After a series of discussions, they decide to sleep with a couple of other people apiece. The wider culture is extremely clear in its rules for what monogamy looks like, and what couplehood looks like. Every character emerges in some way as three-dimensional. (Realistic New York real estate is not the film's strong suit.) They are happy. But as Hale says to Reece at one point, you have to "account for growth." What happens when one person changes the dance step? Nobody's a "type." What is most unexpected about "Permission" is its sense of poignancy and tenderness. You can't have one half of a couple suddenly doing a tango while the other half continues to do the waltz. This open-endedness gives the characters a lot of freedom, since the writer isn't pleading a specific case.

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Movie Review - Rolling Stone

Movie opinions

November' Review Prepare to Have Your Mind Fried By This Far-Out. Travers on 'November' This Far-Out Fairy Tale Will Fry Your Mind. Estonian folk tale involving peasants, perversion and possessed animal skulls should, in a perfect world, become a new midnight-movie classic. Jason Bateman, Rachel McAdams Prove. My opinion may actually be a bit controversial because I am hearing a lot of people liked it, but… As far as I’m concerned, the hard-working people that helped make this movie are criminals and should be held accountable for their actions. I have a lot going on in my personal and professional life, but it’s really nice that you are able to find the time to see so many movies! However, I regret to inform you that the joy you felt from seeing the movie is wrong and problematic. I didn’t, because I haven’t seen the movie, and am not sure if there is a female protagonist or not, but I didn’t like it from what I imagined it to be. The way the movie handled issues that were not discussed or meant to be invoked by said movie was practically nonexistent. I am better than the director of the movie because I avoided all the important issues entirely by not making a movie. Just wondering, did you even understand the subtext of the female protagonist’s final monologue? Isn’t it just like our “sheeple” society to enjoy things? I will be aggressively Twitter-threading when this movie inevitably gets nominated for five Oscars, because it simply did impress me with the way it addressed the scene where I heard that other people liked it. As I explained before, I do 15 minutes of guided meditation every morning, I have a lot on my plate already. I actually, and admittedly controversially, prefer the other movie. Bless you for your adorable ignorant tastes and you’re welcome. Everyone is too busy seeing the movie to see the other movie. However, I can confidently say that the other movie, though underrated, far surpassed the movie in terms of sophisticated cinematography and fewer people liking it. I’d really love to talk more about the reasons that you loved this awful, degenerative movie that I am the one true hero that the world needs for bravely voicing my displeasure for, but I’m late for my appointment to write the word “Actually” 1,000 times on a piece of paper and donate it to charity.

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Annihilation review the most thoughtful science fiction movie since.

Movie opinions

Feb 23, 2018. The latest film from Ex Machina writer-director Alex Garland again digs deep into heady philosophical questions. The film follows characters played by Natalie Portman, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and Tessa Thompson into the heart of an eerie alien anomaly, in a plot that echoes the Russian movie Stalker. SYNOPSIS: Eccentric firearm heiress believes she is haunted by the souls of people killed by the Winchester repeating rifle. Starring Helen Mirren, Jason Clarke, Sarah Snook, Laura Brent, Eamon Farren, Tyler Coppin, Alice Chaston, Finn Scicluna-O’Prey, Angus Sampson, and Emm Wiseman. There’s a brief moment in Winchester (directed by the Spierig Brothers, who at this point are a boulder rolling down a hill in terms of the quality of their films going from the twisty science fiction mind trip Predestination, to the commercially and critically unsuccessful reboot of deadly Saw games with Jigsaw, and now this blunder of a supernatural thriller) where the drug addicted Dr. Eric Price (Jason Clarke) places his head sideways up against an antiquated device composed of holes in the wall intended to take sound and travel it through to designated rooms of the infamous labyrinthine haunted house. An object emerges from the insert; there is no obnoxiously loud audible queue or disorienting visual jolts, rendering it a fairly chilling scare. It also might be quite literally the only eerie moment to be found within Winchester, a gothic thriller with far too many subplots going on at once, actors that don’t even know how to present their character or deliver various lines without appearing hilariously ridiculous (there are a few scenes where Helen Mirren’s Sarah Winchester communicates with spirits covered in a black veil while scribbling things down, a scene far more stupid and unbelievable than anything in Red or her glorified cameo in The Fate of the Furious), and ghosts annoyingly popping out from every direction and room Eric enters as if the Spierig Brothers had discovered the tactic immediately prior to filming. Thankfully, the main attraction of the Winchester house is competently crafted; there are a number of aerial shots to express just how large the mansion actually is. It’s important to note that the house is only seven floors high, meaning that the 100 rooms designed for a specific purpose that I will not spoil (although I will say that the film has a unique dynamic where the protagonist is trying to lock spirits in rather than set them free or cleanse the hell) are sprawled out on the same plane, allowing for plentiful odd detours and unorthodox architectural decisions.

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Real Movie Opinions | CINEMABLEND

Movie opinions

Mar 3, 2018. Finding surprising new life in the found-footage horror genre, Paco Plaza's “REC” movies the first two co-directed with Jaume Belaguero looked like a fantasy franchise with the potential to get better and better. That is, until parts 3 and 4 disappointed sufficiently to end the series with a whimper. Released. Angourie Rice, Justice Smith, Jeni Ross, Lucas Jade Zumann, Rory Mc Donald, Katie Douglas, Jacob Batalon, Ian Alexander, Colin Ford, Jake Sim, Nicole Law, Karena Evans, Owen Teague, Maria Bello, Michael Cram. When it comes to romantic matchups, Hollywood has never been particularly shy about pairing a conventional human being with a fluky, not-of-this-earth partner: a mermaid, a superhero, King Kong, or Zach Galifianakis. But “Every Day,” an adaptation of David Levithan’s 2012 young-adult novel, marks a surprisingly original entry in the genre of fanciful mismatched love story. The film’s heroine, Rhiannon (Angourie Rice), is an effervescent, tuned-in, and utterly normal teenager growing up in a woodsy suburb of Baltimore. The character she falls head over heels for is…a spirit. One who takes over the mind and body of a different local teenager every day, until the clock strikes midnight, at which point the spirit moves on to somebody else. The spirit, whose name is A., can occupy a boy or a girl, of any shape, size, or ethnicity, but he/she is always kind, thoughtful, sharp, funny, observant, and compassionate. You could say — and you’d be right — that “Every Day” is a highly derivative movie, since it contains echoes of a great many other fantasy-contraption love stories. wakes up each morning in the body a different person, greeting the day with a variation on the one before it (and setting the phone alarm for and p.m., like something out of a digital-age Cinderella), is an obvious variation on the premise of “Groundhog Day.” The passing of a persona, like a baton, from one actor to the next owes a debt to Todd Solondz’ extraordinarily underrated satirical fantasia “Palindromes” (2005). And the way that “Every Day” plays around with issues of love and personality — Rhiannon isn’t just falling for an image, she’s falling for a soul — is like the YA version of a conceit out of the Charlie Kaufman pretzel-of-identity playbook.

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