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Hypothesis Testing

Economics hypothesis

A null hypothesis is a type of hypothesis used in statistics that proposes that no statistical significance exists in a set of given observations. Students should read the scenario and then describe the implications of a Type I Error and a Type II error in hypothesis testing. skate manufacturer wants to sell skates in Canada and that he believes that, on average, foot sizes in Canada are smaller than in the United States. Assume that the mean skate size in the United States is known to be 8.5. If the Canadian foot size is smaller, the skate manufacturer will have to redesign his manufacturing process and invest in different machinery. Suppose that his hypothesis is tested by selecting a random sample of foot sizes in Canada. Define Type I and Type II errors and discuss the consequences of a Type I Error and a Type II error for the manufacturer. This is a short exercise to help students transfer a definition of Type I and Type II error into a situation that would have real economic consequences.

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What is an economic hypothesis -

Economics hypothesis

This is an explanation for how wealth or income distribution will be in the future. Some might have the economic hypothesis that the economy will continue to grow. Ronald Reagan's economic policies, which were dubbed "Reaganomics", included large tax cuts and were characterized as trickle-down economics—in this picture, he is outlining his plan for Tax Reduction Legislation from the Oval Office in a televised address, July 1981 Trickle-down economics, also referred to as trickle-down theory, is an economic theory that advocates reducing taxes on businesses and the wealthy in society as a means to stimulate business investment in the short term and benefit society at large in the long term. It is a form of laissez-faire capitalism in general and more specifically supply-side economics. Whereas general supply-side theory favors lowering taxes overall, trickle-down theory more specifically targets taxes on the upper end of the economic spectrum. The term "trickle-down" originated as a joke by humorist Will Rogers and today is often used to criticize economic policies which favor the wealthy or privileged, while being framed as good for the average citizen. In recent history, it has been used by critics of supply-side economic policies, such as "Reaganomics".

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Economic Theory and the Hypothesis of Rationality SpringerLink

Economics hypothesis

Abstract. In this paper, I want to disentangle some of the senses in which the hypothesis of rationality is used in economic theory. In particular, I want to stress that rationality is not a property of the individual alone, although it is usually presented that way. Rather, it gathers not only its force but also its very meaning from the. Definition: A reasonable proposition about the workings of the world that's inspired or implied by a theory and which may or may not be true. An hypothesis is essentially a prediction made by a theory that can be compared with observations in the real world. Hypotheses usually take the form: "If A, the also B." The essence of the scientific method is to test, or verify, hypotheses against real world data. If supported by data over and over again, hypotheses become principles.

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Economics hypothesis

Term. The discipline was renamed in the late 19th century primarily due to Alfred Marshall from "political economy" to "economics" as a shorter term for "economic. On May 25, 1895, Sigmund Freud wrote to his friend Wilhelm Fliess that his intention was to view psychology from a “quantitative” perspective, thus creating “a sort of economics of nerve force” (Freud 1985, 129). This quantitative conception [End Page 311] was first worked out in his abortive , which attempted to explain psychic states solely on the basis of neurology (Freud 1950 [1895], 334 n3). Even after Freud abandoned neurology completely and devoted the rest of his life to psychology, he continued to speak in terms of the “economic” or “quantitative” forces underpinning psychoanalytic thought. Freud’s work was thus full of the language of political economy. Psychic processes, he proclaimed, should be evaluated in terms of “gain” and “loss”; hence the gain from nervous illness [] during which dreamers behaved like entrepreneurs who drew upon the day’s residue of energy to bankroll their nightly expenditure (Freud 1900, 561).

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Efficient-market hypothesis - Wikipedia

Economics hypothesis

Usually this fails and then this supports the case that markets are not efficient. The joint hypothesis problem says that, when this happens, it shows that the model is not complete. There are some factors that are not accounted for. Impacts. The efficient-market hypothesis emerged as a prominent theory in the mid-1960s. Skip Sauer of Clemson University and Econ Talk's Russ Roberts discuss the economics of Michael Lewis's Moneyball. Michael Lewis claims that the Oakland Athletics [A's] found an undervalued asset--the ability of a baseball player to draw a walk--and used that insight to succeed while spending less money than their rivals. Drawing on Sauer's research, Sauer and Roberts try and answer the question and lots of others along the way. Why do some baseball skills get more attention than others? Along the way you'll learn why Kevin Youkilis is a better lead-off hitter than you think and some of the peculiar incentives facing baseball teams and owners. Alternatives: Are the Oakland A's just trying to put together a "good-enough team" to satisfy their clientele, rather than consciously hiring partly based on on-base-percentages or walks? In the podcast Economics of Religion Larry Iannaccone discusses the theory that state-sponsored religion should have the weakest adherents. This seems to work with countries like Sweden, but what about countries like Iran? Hey Professor Roberts, I've been listening to this podcast since the first few episodes and I am very happy to see how well you've expanded on the original premise. I keep an eye out for interesting new economics content on the Net and your podcast is my favourite. The guests you have are always entertaining and very knowledgeable. As an economics major in the college of Arts and Sciences at Indiana University I've found this resource invaluable in terms of reinforcing my economic analysis skills. I've been meaning to chalk the sidewalks outside the econ building to try and get you more listeners as this podcast is a complementary good to most of the classes these students will take. If I may offer a request regarding a future episode, I would really like to see an episode covering international trade, maybe discuss the Doha round and the future of trade relations in an ever flattening world.

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Life-cycle hypothesis - Wikipedia

Economics hypothesis

Mar 12, 2018. Your investment advisor proposes you a monthly income investment plan which promises a variable return each month. You will invest in it only if you are assured of an average $180 monthly income. Your advisor also tells you that for the past 300 months, the scheme had returns with an average value of. IN 1978 Michael Jensen, an American economist, boldly declared that “there is no other proposition in economics which has more solid empirical evidence supporting it than the efficient-markets hypothesis” (EMH). The theory's origins went back to the beginning of the century, but it had come to prominence only a decade or so before. Eugene Fama, of the University of Chicago, defined its essence: that the price of a financial asset reflects all available information that is relevant to its value. From that idea powerful conclusions were drawn, not least on Wall Street. If the EMH held, then markets would price financial assets broadly correctly. Deviations from equilibrium values could not last for long.

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Definition of hypothesis, definition at Economic Glossary

Economics hypothesis

May 24, 2017. Definition and explanation of life-cycle hypothesis. Diagram to explain logic of dissaving and saving. Does it happen in real world? Criticisms of model. In economics, the life-cycle hypothesis (LCH) is a model that strives to explain the consumption patterns of individuals. The life-cycle hypothesis suggests that individuals plan their consumption and savings behaviour over their life-cycle. They intend to even out their consumption in the best possible manner over their entire lifetimes, doing so by accumulating when they earn and dis-saving when they are retired. The key assumption is that all individuals choose to maintain stable lifestyles. This implies that they usually don't save up a lot in one period to spend furiously in the next period, but keep their consumption levels approximately the same in every period.

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Economics Test 1 Flashcards Quizlet

Economics hypothesis

Start studying Economics Test 1. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. In the process, we are able to create hypothetical environments and evaluate economic behaviors. One of the most practical aspects of economics is the development of questions and hypotheses. We formulate an economic question, create a hypothesis about this question, and test to accept or reject that hypothesis. in Resource Economics; master's degrees in economics, human resources, and safety; and has taught masters and doctorate level courses in statistics, research methods, economics, and management. This lesson looks at how to create a question and formulate a hypothesis. When creating questions about economics, you want to find a topic that is interesting and timely. Once this is done, developing an economic question that is answerable is key. A good question: In learning how to formulate an economic question, it helps to look at what a good question is not.

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Trickle-down economics - Wikipedia

Economics hypothesis

The idea of convergence in economics is the hypothesis that poorer economies' per capita incomes will tend to grow at faster rates than richer economies. As a result, all economies should eventually converge in terms of per capita income. Developing countries have the potential to grow at a faster rate than developed. This paper introduces the fair wage-effort hypothesis and explores its implications. This hypothesis is motivated by equity theory in social psychology and social exchange theory in sociology. According to the fair wage-effort hypothesis, workers proportionately withdraw effort as their actual wage falls short of their fair wage. Such behavior causes unemployment and is also consistent with observed cross-section wage differentials and unemployment patterns. We would like to thank Samuel Bowles, Daniel Kahneman, David Levine, John Pencavel, David Romer, and Lawrence Summers for helpful comments and discussions.

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Economics

Economics hypothesis

Hypothesis Testing in Econometrics. Annual Review of Economics. Vol. -104 Volume publication date 2010 First published online as a Review in Advance on February 9, 2010 https//doi.org/10.1146/annurev.economics.102308.124342. Joseph P. Romano,1 Azeem M. Shaikh,2 and Michael Wolf3. 1Departments of. Were we to take the yearly cost of bases and divide it among families in the US we could give each family $5,000 a year. A first year Economics student in High School can answer which would provide the greatest economic benefit to society. The idea that increasing taxes on tax payers earning over $250,000 a year reduces employment as a large portion of that group is small business owners. I have worked in, managed and consulted for small to medium sized businesses my entire career and have never been in a conversation where taxes affected hiring decisions. It is always easy to generate a sturdy or poll that indicates that small business owners would potentially hire more employees if they paid less taxes.

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